Post in evidenza

Raped by the System: the Wadakancherry Rape Case

The prime accused in the case is a corporation councillor belonging to the CPM that is ruling the state

venerdì 25 novembre 2016

Porn Industry and The (In)Human Trade

DENVER, Colo. -  The pornography industry is worth billions of dollars yearly. CBS4’s Jennifer Brice took a rare look into the world of porn and human trafficking happening in Denver. 


She met a woman who used to be in the sex trade and now speaks out against it.
Jessica Neely is a survivor of the porn industry. Her life, however, started on a very different path from the world of pornography.
“I didn’t know anything else but my relationship with God,” said the now 35-year old woman who grew up a pastor’s daughter between Cedaredge and Colorado Springs.
Neely also become a woman of the cloth herself, following in the family footsteps. When she was a 22-year-old, and still a virgin, Neely was living in Estes Park. It’s there that she was working as a youth minister when her life turned upside down.
“I was going out to my car to warm it up when my head was slammed against my car,” she said. “I fell on to the ground.”
Neely was raped by a stranger.
“I wasn’t angry at the person; I was angry at God.”
That’s when Neely’s life changed, radically.
“I am going to choose who I have sex with,” Neely recalled about her mindset. “I am going to choose to get up, put my clothes on and walk away.”
Promiscuous, she said, became a sex addiction. Sex graduated to professional porn. Porn then fueled prostitution.
Her insights to the porn industry is eye opening. She said when a person consumes a scene they are watching the woman and men of that industry self-destruct. Neely said many people in that industry are victims of some kind of abuse. She also said porn is a breeding ground for the human trafficking world.
Every single person in pornography escorts. It is human trafficking.”
To keep her escorting rate competitive, Neely said, she would sign up for as many porn scenes as possible.
And before she knew it, the Pastor’s daughter would eventually become a madam with a brothel out of the Denver Tech Center.
I was a madam based on what I learned in pornography.”
According to Neely, social media sites are ripe with women of all ages that she would turn into escorts. She targeted women ranging from 18 to 35 years old. She said those women were everything from colleges tudents, models, and single moms. Neely would “groom” them the same way, appealing to their needs, weaknesses and financial woes.
Her pitch: “You’re already having sex for free,” Neely recited. “Why don’t you join me?”
Neely says she would zone in on the girls posting provocative pictures on social media sites. She said she knew by the way they portrayed themselves online that they needed attention for a reason.
The quest for attention is what Neely preyed upon.
“I’m not going for modest girls because I don’t need to go through their morals.”
Neely said she didn’t have time for anyone’s morals.
It would take less than three days to groom a girl,” Neely said.
She would take the women escort prospects to expensive dinners at Shanahan’s and Elway’s.
“When I toted this lifestyle in front of them, seduction was so easy,” admitted Neely. “To go after their college debt, I’m like, ‘I can cure that in less than a month.'”
Neely said she would even set the girls up with various plastic surgery appointments within weeks of bringing them onboard.
The women, Neely said, were more challenging to get onboard, but “clients” were in abundance.
“They were your politicians, your sports teams, any gentleman with some extra dollars.”
At best, Neely made $10,000 a day between porn and human trafficking, but money was the only thing she had.
“I didn’t have my friends; I didn’t have my dreams.”
It took 10 years for Neely to get out of the sex trade. She is now an advocate who speaks out against the pitfalls of porn. She travels to schools and churches across the country and tells parents and students how porn kills love.
The night CBS4’s Brice met Neely she was speaking at a conference called “Not for Sale” across Colorado. At Roca Fuerte High School Brice watched her preach about the porn to a group of teenage boys. She told them they would never be satisfied with the path of porn, “Or with the woman God gives you if you are entangled in porn.”
After the conference Brice spoke with several teenage boys who attended. Christian Salcedo, a junior, said that the conference made him realize how much porn is a problem in our community.
Society has normalized it,” said Salcedo. “But just because it’s normalized doesn’t make it okay.”
Jeriel Jimnez said that on his Facebook and Snapchat accounts, even his friends are provocative in how they portrait themselves.
They post very sexual posts and it’s become a norm,” Jimnez said.
Neely says technology now gives porn addictions a place to form, right in the palms of our hands. The addiction, she said, is starting very young. Her advice to people about porn is simple, but sobering.
“One scene is one too many and a thousand is never enough,” said Neely. “This is something that can never ever be satisfied.”

Colorado woman escaped porn industry, warns others about dangers Nov 23, 2016 CBS News - Denver 

For decades, pornography has been praised as the epitome of freedom of expression by men and at times women alike. However, as time goes on, social conservatives and feminists alike — as well as various media outlets and academic organizations — are coming to agree that not only does pornography harm individuals and families, but it is also a major factor in the underground sex slave industry.

The House passed 12 bills to combat sex trafficking. Several of the bills aim to strengthen the State Department’s weapons against traffickers, while others fill gaps in current law. Two bills that would fill gaps are H.R. 159 and H.R. 285, both of which passed the House on Tuesday.
According to a House Judiciary Committee aide, H.R. 159, would use Department of Justice grants to incentivize states to match federal law, which considers “any child who is under 18 and subject to commercial sex trafficking [as] a victim.”

Likewise, the aide said, H.R. 285 “is intended to clarify that the existing federal sex trafficking statute...extends to those who advertise children and other victims for sale for sex.” 

These and other measures are critical to helping the nearly two million mostly women and girls who are sex slaves at any one time. And they will hopefully join several laws signed by President Obama last year.

As great as these bills are, however, they fail to properly address the most important part of sex trafficking: reducing demand before men use, abuse, and torture women, girls and boys for sadistic personal pleasure. And according to one of the nation’s leading academics studying the effect of pornography — a self-described “radical feminist” — pornography is a key ingredient in that demand.
Dr. Gail Dines, a professor of sociology and women’s studies at Wheelock College who also chairs its American Studies department, said in comment for this piece that “we know that trafficking is increasing — which means demand is increasing. This means that men are increasingly willing to have sex with women who are being controlled and abused by pimps and traffickers.”
“There are only two conclusions here: That men are naturally willing to do this to women — biology — or that they are being socialized by the culture to lose all empathy for women,” Dines said. “I refuse to accept that men are born rapists, porn users, or johns.”
“As an academic, a sociologist, and mother, I believe it is the way men are shaped by society,” said Dines. “The biggest sex educator of young men today is pornography, which is increasingly violent and dehumanizing, and it changes the way men view women.”

Dines is not alone in her view. According to the non-profit Fight The New Drug (FTND), which relies on dozens of studies for its pornography data, “men who go to prostitutes are twice as likely to have watched a porn film in the last year compared to the general population.”

FTND’s research also found that “when these customers show up, many come ready with porn images in hand to show the women they’re exploiting—many of which are human trafficking victims controlled by pimps—what they’ll be forced to do.” The organization cites a 2007 study of 854 women in nine countries that found 49% of women “said that porn had been made of them while they were in prostitution, and 47% said they had been harmed by men who had either forced or tried to force their victims to do things the men had seen in porn.”

In other words, when Americans watch porn, they’re fooled into thinking they are always watching free men and women engaging in consensual sexual intercourse. Contrary to the popular image of the porn industry, many women are being forced to have intercourse, be groped, kicked, beaten, etc.
According to FTND CEO Clay Olsen, “porn fuels the demand for the sex trade” in a way often not seen by those who view porn. “Traffickers have learned to package their product in a way that disguises the fact that the ‘performers’ are forced to participate,” said Olsen.
While data on the number of women girls and boys forced into porn is relatively scant, due to its secretive and illegal nature, Dawn Hawkins, Executive Director of National Center on Sexual Exploitation, told me that “the 20+ performers I have talked to (some still involved in porn) have all shared stories with me that they were forced and coerced many times over.”
“Drugs, alcohol, physical abuse, blackmail, threats, fake legal documents, deceitful enticing, promises of fame and money and so much more are used to get the girls to perform what and how the producers desire,” she added.
Pornography doesn’t just cause harm to those held in slavery — it has been linked to premature ejaculation and a loss of sexual control among men, and relationships and families are also devastated by porn. The highly-acclaimed movie “Don Jon,” for example, highlighted what is a reality for many couples and families: that addiction to porn tears men away from their girlfriends, spouses, and children. As such, it is often a major factor in divorce.
Again, the Senate and President Obama should take the House’s lead in protecting victims of sex trafficking. However, like any industry, demand is what creates supply. As long as America’s men are being trained to think that violent, disturbing pornography is sexually acceptable, an enormous clientele for sex traffickers is being created every day in homes, college dorms, and apartments across the nation.

Want to Stop Sex Trafficking? Look to America’s Porn Addiction Mar 30, 2015 John-Henry Westen 

Sex Trafficking Statistics

  • 30 million people are living as slaves today
  • Sex trafficking is the third largest criminal enterprise in the world 
  • Forced prostitution is a significant part of the $31 billion dollar human trafficking industry
  • 80 percent of victims are women
  • 50 percent of victims are younger than 12-years-old
  • 2 million boys and girls are sold every year
  • A child can be bought for as little as $30
  • A prostituted child can serve from 100 to 1,500 clients a year
Source: Human Dignity, Slavery, and Sex Trafficking Symposium

Pornography Statistics

  • 89 percent of porn comes from the United States
  • 260 new explicit sites are put online every day
  • 20 percent of all internet searches are related in some way to porn
  • 66-90 percent of women involved in the production of porn were sexually abused as children
Source: Human Dignity, Slavery, and Sex Trafficking Symposium
A woman crossed the stage of the Elliott Hall of Music wearing a scarf around her head, having recently been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. No one would have assumed that this bubbly woman cracking jokes was once a sex slave.
As part of her presentation, “I Once Was a Sex Slave but Now I am Free,Melissa Woodward shared her story on Friday as part of Purdue’s weekend-long Annual Symposium. The Symposium, led by a number of ministries and churches on campus, alters its topic every year. This year’s is titled “Human Dignity, Slavery and Sex Trafficking.”
“I wish I could say this is out of the ordinary,” Woodward said. “When I was 10 years old, life was pretty normal from the outside. It’s hard to imagine a child in (slavery). It’s harder to imagine she might be going to the school you went to, she might be in your girl scout troop ... your dance company, your church. I was not hidden ... I was right there in plain view.”
Starting when she was 4, Woodward’s parents would dress her up and take her to bars, where there was “no shortage of predators” ready to take advantage of a small girl. The daughter of a Baptist pastor and a school teacher, Woodward started taking “clients” even before her teenage years. Without her having any say in the matter, her family placed Woodward in the sex trafficking industry.
“I had no choice to run. I couldn’t say no,” Woodward said. “I had no rights whatsoever. I was held captive, in fear for my life and I wanted the nightmare to end.”
Her dreams of being a mother and a police officer were cut short when she was pulled out of school, which had been her only place of refuge. She was taken to an underground warehouse, where she and 14 other girls were handcuffed to twin-sized beds for 16 hours every day, serving clients. Her clients were often CEOs, doctors and lawyers, men whose high status in society would allow them to evade capture.
“Finally, one day, a gentleman walked in, and after his deed was done, he pulled a small flask of lighter fluid,” Woodward said. “He looked at me and said, ‘I’ve always wanted to see a child burn to death, and I’m picking you.’”
At first filled with sheer horror, Woodward then felt relieved that she would escape her situation through death. Burned from the waist down, Woodward later underwent multiple surgeries and begged her doctors not to send her home.
At 14 years old, Woodward didn’t know how she'd make it without a family or an education. For years afterwards, she made a living taking more clients and going into adult entertainment. She struggled with drugs and went in and out of bad marriages.
It wasn’t until her 5-year-old daughter approached her and wanted to talk about “Big Jesus” that Woodward knew she had to make major changes in her life for her three kids and for herself.
“Out of the mouth of my baby girl came a message of love, hope and grace ... I wanted something to wipe this slate clean and someone to love me because I didn’t love myself.”
After joking with the audience about having to attend church in hooker clothes, Woodward said salvation helped her find her way again and broke her drug addiction. She was able to forgive herself, her abusers and her family.
In contrast to sex trafficking, many may argue that people in the porn industry are not “slaves” because they make the choice to work in that industry. However, Crissy Moran, a former porn star and the second speaker at the Symposium, explained the degrading and undignified nature of that environment.
“I did choose the path I went into, but it’s enslaving all the same,” Moran said. “One of the things that keeps women in the industry is monetary (gain) and the lifestyle that comes with it. Many women can’t make that kind of money (outside) of the industry.”
At 4 years old, Moran was sexually assaulted by a neighbor. That traumatic experience taught her at a young age that sex was something that people wanted and would forcefully take. As she got older, her father developed an alcohol problem and brought his friends around Moran, who often looked at her in a lustful way.
Love remained something unknown to Moran as she continued to look for a “fairy tale romance.” She was implicitly taught that she could use sex to attempt to achieve love. In and out of different relationships, Moran felt bothered whenever her boyfriends watched porn.
“I was so jealous; I couldn’t handle it,” Moran said. “When I got into it, I thought that’s just what men like and if he’s going to watch it (and) I’m doing it, then he’ll have this perfect woman.”
Moran learned to disassociate herself from her job, but she still struggled with the way her life had changed. Knowing that there was something better waiting for her, Moran left the industry after six years. She’s now happily married.
“I hope that by me sharing my story, it shows you the woman with a heartbeat behind the movie,” Moran said. “I work with many women in the sex industry, sex trafficking, prostitution. We’re not objects. We have feelings and emotions, hopes and dreams. No one wants to be enslaved.”

The Connections Between Pornography and Sex Trafficking

Human Trafficking & Pornography U.S. Catholic Sisters Against Human Trafficking



POP PORNO (MUTATIS MUTANDE) 6 FEBBRAIO 2011




ADDICTED TO PORN 23 LUGLIO 2016


Health warning on porn for sex addicts 28 maggio 2016

Porn addiction is causing a rise in erectile dysfunction 17 agosto 2016

PORN REWIRING OF THE YOUNG BRAINS 5 GENNAIO 2015

New Studies Link Porn to Sexual Violence 9 GENNAIO 2016

Pornography: a grave threat to public health 14 luglio 2016

PORNO NEUTRALITA' 31 OTTOBRE 2015

Ban on Extreme Pornography 22 agosto 2016

Violence Against Women in Pornography 15 luglio 2016

PORN: A CULTURE OF VIOLENCE 29 MAGGIO 2016


Rape Porn Culture 1 NOVEMBRE 2016

India, Rape videos on WhatsApp 21 novembre 2016

The Politics of Pornography 30 AGOSTO 2016

PORNO IMPERO di Alexxx Mannucci Third Edition


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